IMPORTANCE OF THE SERVICE INDUSTRY TO HONG KONG’S PROSPERITY & WELLBEING

While the industrial age was about efficiently managing technology and machines, the post-industrial service age is about effectively leading and influencing people. With 93 percent of its GDP derived from the services sector [1], Hong Kong’s competitiveness and prosperity are clearly tied to its citizens’ ability to outperform competitors in the fields of service leadership and service management.

HKI-SLAM believes all successful service companies, like happy families, have a common set of performance codes that are exemplified by the character and care of their leaders and the personal concern and care their employees extend to their colleagues, suppliers and customers. Less successful service companies, just like unhappy families,exhibit a wide variety of negative traits and behaviors that contribute to poorer performance and less profitable returns.

HKI-SLAM believes it’s imperative that Hong Kong university graduates have a working knowledge, appreciation, and commitment to continuously develop their service leadership competencies, character strengths, and caring disposition.

CHINESE CULTURE, WESTERN INSTITUTIONS, AND HONG KONG BUSINESS ACUMEN

Most of Hong Kong’s university students already have a distinct service leadership advantage due to their exposure to Hong Kong’s Chinese cultural values [2], western institutions such as rule of law and independent judiciary, and a unique social and business history.

Building on these, HKI-SLAM intends to promote the use of local case studies, students’ personal narratives, evidence-based educational good practices, and ongoing action-in-practice research to help universities help students make connections, search reflectively for meaning, and learn to continuously develop and refine competitive personal advantages that promote their and Hong Kong’s prosperity and wellbeing.

A NEED FOR SYSTEMATIC SLAM EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

According to Bitner& Brown (2008) [3], “Despite the economic domination of services [in Hong Kong], there is relatively little formal focus within companies and governments [or universities] on service research and innovation compared to the focus on tangible products and technologies.”

REFERENCES

[1]Hong Kong Census and Statistics Department, 12 November, 2010.
[2]

Shek, Daniel, (2011). “Virtues of Confucianism”, unpublished paper.

[3]

Bitner, M.J., and Brown, S.W., (2008). “The Service Imperative,” Business Horizons.